Physiology & Biophysics

Courses


Courses Offered



PHOL 351 Independent Study (credit as arranged)


Fall Days:TBD Time:TBD Location:TBD
Taught by Primary and Secondary Faculty
Director:
Andrea Romani, MD, PhD 216-368-1625 andrea.romani@case.edu

This course is a guided program of study of physiology textbooks, reviews and original articles for CWRU undergraduate students.  Guided laboratory projects to reproduce and extend classical physiological experiments are offered to the undergraduate science major.  This course is being offered in conjunction with the graduate level course PHOL 451.  Students are required to consult with the faculty member whose work they have interest in and plan their individual experience.




PHOL 398 Undergraduate Seminar (1)


Fall M 4 p.m. School of Medicine E501
Director:
Thomas M. Nosek, PhD 216-368-3242 thomas.nosek@case.edu

Weekly one-hour reviews by faculty or invited speakers on their research for CWRU undergraduate students.




PHOL 401 Physiology and Biophysics of Molecules and Cells (4)


Spring MWF 2:30 p.m. School of Medicine E504
Directors:
William P. Schilling, PhD 216-778-8965 wps@case.edu
Witold K. Surewicz, PhD 216-368-0139 witold.surewicz@case.edu

PHOL401A/B--Physiology and Biophysics of Molecules and Cells--is a graduate-level introductory course
designed to provide the fundamental principles of modern physiology, protein science and structural biology,
and to prepare students for advanced courses in the biomedical sciences. The course is divided into 2 blocks
that can be taken independently (PHOL401A and PHOL401B; 2 credit hrs each) or sequentially during the
Spring semester of each year. The first block (401A) will cover the structure and function of proteins and
lipids, and the organization of cellular membranes. Topics will include primary, secondary, tertiary and
quarternary protein structure and analysis, enzyme kinetics, allostery and cooperativity, lipid membrane
organization and domain structure, and protein-protein and protein-lipid interactions. The second block
(401B) will cover molecular pathways and processes critical for cellular homeostasis, function, and signaling.
Topics will include molecular mechanisms of transport across biological membranes and cellular
compartments, ionic basis of the resting membrane potential, action potential generation and propagation,
regulation of voltage-gated channels and electrogenic transporters, cellular volume and pH regulation, and the
biophysics of epithelial transport.

Syllabus


PHOL 402 Physiology Basis for Disease (4)


Fall MWF 2 p.m. School of Medicine E504
Director:
Jeffrey L. Garvin, PhD 216-368-3353 jeffrey.garvin@case.edu

Physiology Basis for Disease is a graduate-level introductory course designed to provide the
fundamental physiology of a select group of organ systems and examples of how the molecular basis of
disease affects physiological function of these systems. As such PHOL402 will prepare students for
future study in advanced biomedical sciences courses. Select diseases of the endocrine, central nervous,
pulmonary, cardiac and renal systems will be covered. The course is 4 credit hours and will be given in
the Fall semester of each year. Class will meet Monday, Wednesday and Friday for 80 min. The format
will be a combination of lecture and journal paper presentations and discussion. Grading will be based
on five short answer/essay examinations given at the end of each section (50%), class participation
(30%) and a final presentation (20%)

Syllabus


PHOL 430 Advanced Structural Biology I (3)


Spring WF Time:TBD TBA
Director:

Provides students with an in-depth introduction to biophysical techniques used to quantify macromolecular structures. A major part of the course will deal with the use of nuclear magnetic resonance to derive 3-D structures of macromolecules in solution. Other topics include electron spin resonance, absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spetros copies, Raman and infrared spectroscopies and methods used in modeling. Taken with "Advanced Methods in Structural Biology II". This course will provide an extensive overview for graduate students specializing in structural biology. The course will be mostly lecture based. This course is cross-listed with CHEM 430, PHRM 430, and BIOC 430.




PHOL 434 Structural Biology (3)


Fall Days:TBD Time:TBD Location:TBD
Director:

This couse is offered by the Department of Biochemistry as BIOC 434.
The Director is Paul R. Carey, PhD, please contact him with any questions.




PHOL 451 Independent Study in Physiology (3)


Fall/Spring/Summer Days:TBD Time:TBD TBA
Directors:
Walter F. Boron, MD, PhD 216-368-8978 walter.boron@case.edu
Matthias Buck, MA, DPhil 216-368-8651 matthias.buck@case.edu
Sudha Chakrapani, PhD 216-368-3875 sudha.chakrapani@case.edu
Isabelle Deschenes, PhD 216-778-5166 isabelle.deschenes@case.edu
George R. Dubyak, PhD 216-368-5523 george.dubyak@case.edu
Christopher P. Ford, PhD 303-724-4747 christopher.ford@ucdenver.edu
Jeffrey L. Garvin, PhD 216-368-3353 jeffrey.garvin@case.edu
Stephen W. Jones, PhD 216-368-5527 stephen.w.jones@case.edu
Joseph C. LaManna, PhD 216-368-1112 joseph.lamanna@case.edu
Tingwei Mu, PhD 216-368-0750 tingwei.mu@case.edu
Thomas M. Nosek, PhD 216-368-3242 thomas.nosek@case.edu
Xin Qi, PhD 216-368-4459 xin.qi2@case.edu
Rajesh Ramachandran, PhD 216-368-2513 rajesh.ramachandran@case.edu
Andrea Romani, MD, PhD 216-368-1625 andrea.romani@case.edu
William P. Schilling, PhD 216-778-8965 wps@case.edu
Corey Smith, PhD 216-368-3487 corey.smith@case.edu
Julian E. Stelzer, PhD 216-368-8636 julian.stelzer@case.edu
Witold K. Surewicz, PhD 216-368-0139 witold.surewicz@case.edu

For students enrolled in the Masters in Medical Physiology program, this course replaces the Masters’ thesis. The students are required to write a 20-25 page state-of-the art manuscript, on a topic of physio-pathological relevance, under the guidance of their academic advisor.

For all other graduate students, the course emphasizes faculty-directed student self-learning, utilizing physiology textbooks, research reviews, and original research articles, followed-up by discussion sessions with the faculty.  This course can be taken with any of the primary or secondary faculty in the Department. A laboratory research project may also be included (1-3 credits).




PHOL 456 Structure and Function of Proteins (2)


Fall Th 4 p.m. E-504
Director:
Matthias Buck, MA, DPhil 216-368-8651 matthias.buck@case.edu

The goal of this course is to provide a basic working knowledge of protein structure/function and molecular biology.  The course begins with a discussion of protein structure and enzyme catalysis followed by protein purification and characterization.  The course then addresses concepts relating to the application of modern molecular biology techniques.  Students are taught how to clone genes and use these clones in animals-and cell-based studies.  The overall goal is to provide students with an understanding of proteins and genetic approaches that can be used in experimental work and to facilitate comprehension of the scientific literature. (3 credits - twice weekly- 1.5 h/lecture)

Syllabus


PHOL 466 Cell Signaling (3)


Spring TTh 3:30 p.m. E-504
Director:
George R. Dubyak, PhD 216-368-5523 george.dubyak@case.edu

This is an advanced lecture/journal/discussion format course that covers cell signaling mechanisms. Includes are discussions of neurotransmitter-gated ion channels, growth factor receptor kinases, cytokine receptors, G protein-coupled receptors, steroid receptors, heterotrimeric G proteins, ras family GTPases, second messenger cascades, protein kinase cascades, second messenger regulation of transcription factors, microtubule-based motility, actin/myosin-based motility, signals for regulation of cell cycle, signals for regulation of apoptosis. (3 credits - twice weekly - 2 h/lecture)

Syllabus


PHOL 467 Topics in Evolutionary Biology (3)


Fall TTh 1:15 p.m. Clark Hall 309
Director:
Joseph C. LaManna, PhD 216-368-1112 joseph.lamanna@case.edu

The focus for this course on a special topic of interest in evolutionary biology will vary from one offering to the next.  Examples of possible topics include theories of speciation, the evolution of language, the evolution of sex, evolution and biodiveristy, molecular evolution.

ANAT/ANTH/EEPS/PHIL/PHOL 467/BIOL 468 will require a longer, more sophisticated term paper, and additional class presentation.

Syllabus


PHOL 468 Membrane Physiology (3)


Fall MW 8:30 a.m. E-504
Director:
William P. Schilling, PhD 216-778-8965 wps@case.edu

This student-guided discussion/journal course focuses on biological membranes. Topics discussed include termodynamics and kinetics of membrane transport, oxidative phosphorylation and bioenergetics, electro-physiology of excitable membranes, and whole and single channel electrophysiology, homeostasis and pH regulation, volume and calcium regulation. (3 credits - twice weekly 1.5 h/lecture)

Syllabus


PHOL 475 Protein Biophysics (3)


Spring TTh 4 p.m. E614
Director:
Matthias Buck, MA, DPhil 216-368-8651 matthias.buck@case.edu

This course focuses on in-depth understanding of the molecular biophysics of proteins.  Structural, thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of protein function and structure-function relationships will considered at the advanced conceptual level.  The application of these theoretical frameworks will be illustrated with examples from the literature and integration of biophysical knowledge with description at the cellular and systems level.  The format consists of lectures, problems sets, and student presentations.  A special emphasis will be placed on discussion of original publications. (3 credits - twice weekly)

Syllabus


PHOL 476 Cell Biophysics (3)


Spring WF 3:30 p.m. E546
Director:
Stephen W. Jones, PhD 216-368-5527 stephen.w.jones@case.edu

This course focuses on a quantitative understanding of cellular processes.  It is designed for students who feel comfortable with and are interested in analytical and quantitative approaches to cell biology and cell physiology.  Selected topics in cellular biophysics will be covered in depth.  Topics include theory of electrical and optical signal processing used in cell physiology, thermodynamics and kinetics of enzyme and transport reactions, single ion channel kinetics and excitability, mechanotransduction, and transport across polarized cell layers.  The format consists of lectures, problem sets, computer simulations, and discussion of original publications.  The relevant biological background of topics will be provided appropriate for non-biology science majors. (4 credits-twice weekly)

Syllabus


PHOL 480 Physiology of Organ Systems (4)


Spring MWTh 8 a.m. E504
Director:
Andrea Romani, MD, PhD 216-368-1625 andrea.romani@case.edu

This course combines an advanced introduction to the fundamental physiological principles governing the major organ systems in mammals with discussion of major physio-pathological topics.  The function of the nervous, endocrine, digestive, muscle, circulatory, respiratory, and urinary systems are discussed.  The course is integrated by weekly translational classes addressing relevant biomedical topics selected in conjunction with the class.

Syllabus


PHOL 481 Medical Physiology I (6)


Fall MTTh 10 a.m. E501
Director:
Andrea Romani, MD, PhD 216-368-1625 andrea.romani@case.edu

This course combines an advanced introduction to the fundamental physiological principles governing the major organ systems in mammals with discussion of major physio-pathological topics.  The function of the nervous, skeletal muscle, cardiac, circulatory, and respiratory systems are discussed using a highly interactive, lecture based format.




PHOL 482 Medical Physiology II (6)


Spring MTTh 10 a.m. E501
Director:
Andrea Romani, MD, PhD 216-368-1625 andrea.romani@case.edu

This course combines an advanced introduction to the fundamental physiological principles governing the major organ systems in mammals with discussion of major physio-pathological topics.  The function of the digestive, urinary, endocrine, and reproductive systems are discussed using a highly interactive, lecture based format.  At the conclusion of the semester, integrative aspects of major organ systems physiology will be illustrated through consideration of specific topics including exercise, high altitude physiology, pregnancy, and aging.




PHOL 483 Translational Physiology I (2)


Fall F 10 a.m. E-501
Director:
Joseph C. LaManna, PhD 216-368-1112 joseph.lamanna@case.edu

The Medical Physiology courses are prerequisites for the Translational Physiology courses (it is expected that they will be taken concurrently).  The faculty coordinating a Medical Physiology block will choose the clinical cases that they think would best complement the material taught in the Medical Physiology course.  A clinical faculty member will give a 45 minute presentation on this topic.  The second hour of each class will be dedicated to discussing this material, often in the context of a clinical paper that the students will have been assigned to read before the class.  There may also be a discussion of the clinical cases highlighted in the chapters in BandB covered that week.  Students should come to class prepared to discuss these cases.  The clinical faculty member will be invited to attend the second hour of the class.  In the last week of each block, the Translational Physiology course will be moved from Friday to Wednesday and Thursday will be a study day.




PHOL 484 Translational Physiology II (2)


Spring F Time:TBD Location:TBD
Director:
Joseph C. LaManna, PhD 216-368-1112 joseph.lamanna@case.edu

The Medical Physiology courses are prerequisites for the Translational Physiology courses (it is expected that they will be taken concurrently).  The faculty coordinating a Medical Physiology block will choose the clinical cases that they think would best complement the material taught in the Medical Physiology course.  A clinical faculty member will give a 45 minute presentation on this topic.  The second hour of each class will be dedicated to discussing this material, often in the context of a clinical paper that the students will have been assigned to read before the class.  There may also be a discussion of the clinical cases highlighted in the chapters in BandB covered that week.  Students should come to class prepared to discuss these cases.  The clinical faculty member will be invited to attend the second hour of the class.  In the last week of each block, the Translational Physiology course will be moved from Friday to Wednesday and Thursday will be a study day.




PHOL 498 Physiology and Biophysics Departmental Seminar (1)


Fall/Spring M 4 p.m. E501
Director:
Stephen W. Jones, PhD 216-368-5527 stephen.w.jones@case.edu

Weekly one-hour reviews by faculty or invited speakers on their research. Students present literature reviews or summaries of their research.    




PHOL 505 Laboratory of Research Rotation (3)


Fall Days:TBD Time:TBD Location:TBD
Director:
George R. Dubyak, PhD 216-368-5523 george.dubyak@case.edu

One-semester experience in a selected faculty research laboratory designed to introduce the student to all aspects of modern laboratory research including the design, execution, and analysis of original experimental work.  




PHOL 514 Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology (3)


Spring TF 8 a.m. E-504
Director:
Julian E. Stelzer, PhD 216-368-8636 julian.stelzer@case.edu

The goal of this course is to provide the student with a solid foundation in cardiovascular physiology and pathophysiology.  The course will begin by providing a solid foundation in the structure, phenotype and function of cardiac and vascular muscle.  In addition, elctrophysiology and metabolism will be addressed.  After covering the basic physiology, more advanced topics, such as pathophysiology, will covered using a journal club format.

Syllabus


PHOL 517 Optical Microscopy and Imaging for Biologists (0)


Semester:TBD Days:TBD Time:TBD Location:TBD
Director:
Ulrich Hopfer, MD, PhD 216-368-2878 ulrich.hopfer@case.edu

This intense lecture and laboratory-based course will cover basic concepts of light microscopy and introduce advanced techniques relevant to modern cell and molecular biology.  Students will gain extensive hands-on experience with state-of-the-art equipment for optical imaging guided by experienced academic instructors.  The latest and most advanced instrumentation for light microscopy, image detection, and computerized image analysis will be available for us in the laboratory part of this course.




PHOL 519 Advance Pulmonary Physiology (3)


Spring TTh 3:30 p.m. E546
Director:
Peter MacFarlane, PhD 216-844-7345 peter.macfarlane@case.edu

This course is designed to integrate systemic, cellular and molecular aspects of cardio-respiratory systems in physiological and pathophysiological states. The course requires prior knowledge of basic physiology of the cardiovascular systems. Extensive student participation is required. Instructors provide a brief overview of the topic followed by presentation and critical appraisal of recent scientific literature by students.

Syllabus


PHOL 601 Lab Research (0)


Semester:TBD Days:TBD Time:TBD Location:TBD
Taught by Primary and Secondary Faculty
Director:
Witold K. Surewicz, PhD 216-368-0139 witold.surewicz@case.edu

Cellular physiology laboratory research activities that are based on faculty and student interests. (1-36 credtis) 




PHOL 610 Oxygen and Physiological Function (3)


Spring TTh 10 a.m. E-546
Director:
Joseph C. LaManna, PhD 216-368-1112 joseph.lamanna@case.edu

Lecture/discussion course which explores the significance and consequences of oxygen and oxygen metabolism in living organisms. Topics to be covered include oxygen transport by blood tissues, oxygen toxicity, and mitochondrial metabolism. Emphasis will be placed on mammalian physiology with special reference to brain oxidative metabolism and blood flow as well as whole body energy expenditure and oxidative stress related to disease. (3 credits- twice weekly - 1.5 hr/session) Permission of instructor required.

Syllabus


PHOL 651 Thesis (MS) (credit as arranged)


Fall Days:TBD Time:TBD Location:TBD
Taught by Primary and Secondary Faculty
Director:
Thomas M. Nosek, PhD 216-368-3242 thomas.nosek@case.edu

(credit as arranged)




PHOL 701 Thesis Research (PhD) (credit as arranged)


Fall Days:TBD Time:TBD Location:TBD
Taught by Primary and Secondary Faculty
Director:
Witold K. Surewicz, PhD 216-368-0139 witold.surewicz@case.edu

(credit as arranged)