Physiology & Biophysics

Seminars


During the academic year, we sponsor a seminar on most Mondays at 4:00 PM, in the Lecture Hall (E501). We pride ourselves on presenting, at almost every seminar, an eminent scholar from around the country or around the globe.



Upcoming Seminars


DEPARTMENT & CCMSB JOINT SPECIAL SEMINAR

"Lipid-Protein Interactions Through a 'Computational Microscope': Molecular Simulation Studies of Complex Biological Membranes"

Mark S. P. Sansom, DPhil
Hosted by:
Matthias Buck, MA, DPhil
Feb. 23, 2018 noon
School of Medicine E501


DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Molecular mechanisms of NMDA receptor function and regulation"

Nami Tajima, PhD
Feb. 26, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E504

N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs) belong to a class of ionotropic glutamate receptors that are crucially involved in brain development and function, and NMDAR dysfunction is implicated in various neurological diseases. The transmembrane ion channel opens upon membrane depolarization and agonist binding to the extracellular ligand-binding domain, while the extracellular amino terminal domain (ATD) tightly regulates functional properties.  Although NMDAR structures representing inhibited states are available, there is no clear understanding of how conformational alteration in the extracellular domains regulate NMDAR activity. In my talk, I will describe the first structural evidence for conformational alteration of the NMDARs and how the NMDARs are activated and inhibited.

To understand the regulation mechanisms above, I conducted structural and functional studies. First I present the first structural evidence for conformational alteration in the NMDAR ATD wherein the bilobed structure of the ATD opens and closes. On the basis of structure-based mutagenesis coupled to electrophysiology, I show that stabilization of open and closed cleft conformations leads to activation and allosteric inhibition, respectively. In order to understand the conformational change in the context of full length, we obtained the intact NMDAR structure in an active conformation by cryo-electron microscopy in the absence of inhibitors. These studies allow us to uncover the conformational change in multiple domains and molecular mechanisms. After highlighting my work on NMDARs, I will conclude with my plans to elucidate the regulation mechanisms of another ionotropic glutamate receptor Kainate receptor by auxiliary subunits using Cryo-electron microscopy, X-ray crystallography and electrophysiology. 


DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"To Be or Not To Be: The Triggering of Cell Death Signaling by Protein Oligomerization"

Tianmin Fu, PhD
March 5, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501


SPECIAL DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Structural studies of macromolecules using electron cryo-microscopy (cryo-EM)"

Jean-Paul Armache, PhD
March 8, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501


DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Biophysical Contributions to Glomerular Disease Initiation and Progression"

R. Tyler Miller, MD
Hosted by:
Walter F. Boron, MD, PhD
March 12, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501


6TH ANNUAL ULRICH HOPFER LECTURE

"Regulation of Aqp2 gene expression by vasopressin"

Mark A. Knepper, MD, PhD
Hosted by:
Walter F. Boron, MD, PhD
March 19, 2018 4 p.m.
School of Medicine E501


DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Bacterial Outer Membranes and Interactions with Membrane Proteins"

Wonpil Im, PhD
Hosted by:
Matthias Buck, MA, DPhil
April 2, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

The outer membrane of gram-negative bacteria is a unique asymmetric membrane bilayer that is composed of phospholipids in the inner leaflet and lipopolysaccharides (LPS) in the outer leaflet. Its function as a selective barrier is crucial for the survival of bacteria in many distinct environments, and it also renders gram-negative bacteria more resistant to antibiotics than their gram-positive counterparts. LPS comprises three regions: lipid A, core oligosaccharide, and O-antigen polysaccharide. In this talk, I will present our ongoing efforts on understanding various bacterial outer membranes and their interactions with outer membrane proteins, including (1) construction of a model of an E. coli R1 (core) O6 (antigen) LPS molecule using the CHARMM36 lipid and carbohydrate force fields and simulations of various E. coli R1.O6 LPS bilayers; (2) modeling of E. coli R2, R3, R4, and K12 cores and other O-antigens and their bilayer simulations; (3) development of LPS Modeler in CHARMM-GUI; (4) modeling and simulation of E. coli outer membranes with phospholipids in the inner leaflet and LPS in the outer leaflet as well as OmpLA in the outer membrane; (5) modeling and simulation of BamA in the E. coli outer membrane; (6) other ongoing outer membrane - protein simulations in other bacteria.


 


DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Ribosome-Peptide Pas de Deux: Tunnel Vision"

Carol J. Deutsch, PhD
Hosted by:
Tingwei Mu, PhD
April 9, 2018 4 p.m.
School of Medicine E501


DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Huntingtin Misfolding and Membrane Interaction – Implications for Huntington’s Disease"

Ralf Langen, PhD
Hosted by:
Witold K. Surewicz, PhD
April 16, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

The misfolding and membrane interaction of amyloidogenic proteins is thought to play important roles in the pathogenesis of various neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, and Huntington’s disease. Prevention of misfolding and membrane damage is a potential avenue for blocking disease progression. We have identified various misfolding intermediates and fibril types of htt. We find that misfolding is a step-wise process where different domains mature at very different rates.  Using a combination of biophysical tools, including EPR, solid state NMR, solution NMR, and electron microscopy, we have characterized the structures of the various misfolding intermediates and defined three distinctively different misfolding pathways. We also identified structural differences between potentially toxic and non-toxic aggregated forms of htt. This information is a first step toward identifying potential structural features that are associated with toxicity.
 


DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Chemistry at the membrane: an unnatural approach in a natural setting"

Sharona Gordon, PhD
Hosted by:
Sudha Chakrapani, PhD
April 23, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501


DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Physical Mechanisms of Cell Organization on Micron Length Scales"

Michael K. Rosen, PhD
Hosted by:
Michael Babinchak
April 30, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501



Past Seminars


SPECIAL DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Trap and Flip": Conformational Snapshots and Mechanism of a Lipid Flippase"

Wei Mi, PhD
Feb. 15, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Structural basis for selective antagonism of Nav channels and ABC transporters"

Jian Payandeh, PhD
Hosted by:
Soumili Chatterjee
Feb. 12, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Properties and regulation of renal ammonia transport by Rh glycoproteins"

Nazih L. Nakhoul, PhD
Hosted by:
Walter F. Boron, MD, PhD
Jan. 29, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"The Molecular Physiology of store-operated CRAC channels"

Murali Prakriya, PhD
Hosted by:
Sudha Chakrapani, PhD
Jan. 22, 2018 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Slc4a11: a H+ channel in HCO3- transporter’s clothing"

Mark Parker, PhD
Hosted by:
Walter F. Boron, MD, PhD
Nov. 20, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Bulk vs Selective: The Mechanisms of Cellular Self-Eating"

Steven K. Backues, PhD
Hosted by:
Rajesh Ramachandran, PhD
Nov. 13, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Life at the interface is occasionally unstable"

Ashutosh Agrawal, PhD
Hosted by:
Rajesh Ramachandran, PhD
Nov. 6, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Microtubules as Disease Modifiers and Therapeutic Targets in Striated Muscle"

Chris Ward, PhD
Hosted by:
Jessica M. Berthiaume, PhD
Oct. 30, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Mechanisms that regulate the efficacy of GABAergic inhibition and the pathophysiology of epilepsy"

Stephen J. Moss, PhD
Hosted by:
Tingwei Mu, PhD
Oct. 16, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Towards a high-resolution structure of the proton-coupled folate transporter"

Michaela Jansen, PharmD, PhD
Hosted by:
Sudha Chakrapani, PhD
Oct. 9, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Microscopic View of Mechanisms and Pathways for Material Transport Across the Cellular Membrane"

Emad Tajkhorshid, PhD
Hosted by:
Rossana Occhipinti, PhD
Oct. 2, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

3RD ANNUAL MATTHEW N. LEVY LECTURE

"Diversity of Cardiac Ion Channel Regulatory Mechanisms"

Jeanne M. Nerbonne, PhD
Sept. 28, 2017 3 p.m. - 4 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DEPARTMENT SEMINAR

"Muscle-Specific Regulation of Autophagy and Its Potential Role in Protecting Against Sepsis-Induced Cardiomyopathy"

Monte S. Willis, MD, PhD, MBA, FCAP, FAHA
Hosted by:
Julian E. Stelzer, PhD
Sept. 18, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501

DCAPT SEMINAR

"Blood-brain barrier and neurological diseases"

Damir Janigro, PhD
Hosted by:
Joseph C. LaManna, PhD
Sept. 11, 2017 4 p.m. - 5 p.m.
School of Medicine E501



View Archived Seminars